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The Red River War Depicted at the Panhandle-Plains History Museum

Art work from A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art

Art work from A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art

A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art
Panhandle-Plains History Museum
October 3, 2009 through February 14, 2009

Depictions of the dramatic and critical “Battle at Little Big Horn” are prolific. However, without such a dramatic and pivotal battle, artists’ paintings of the U.S. Army on the Southern Plains are less well known. A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art, at the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum October 3, 2009, through February 14, 2010, shows the U. S. Army’s campaigns against American Indians on the Southern Plains through paintings, drawings and chromolithographs.

The critical battle of the Red River War began as the sun rose on September 28, 1874, when Colonel Ranald S. Mackenzie, in command of the Fourth Cavalry, charged into Palo Duro Canyon. At least five Indian villages had sought protection in the hidden isolation of Palo Duro Canyon.

This exhibition will be the first of its kind to focus on this particular aspect of the American West, assembling depictions of the events leading up to this particular campaign. Artists drawn to the Red River War are those of national repute such as Frederic Remington, Nick Eggenhofer, W. Herbert Dunton and Edward Borein, as well as Texas artists such as H. D. Bugbee, Ben Carlton Mead and John Eliot Jenkins.

Art work from A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art

Art work from A Running Fight: The Red River War in Art

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