Imagine Your Gallery Here

New Exhibit Opens at the Dallas Holocaust Museum

"Every Child Has a Name" at the Dallas Holocaust Museum / Center for Education and Tolerance

“Every Child Has a Name” at the Dallas Holocaust Museum / Center for Education and Tolerance

Every Child Has a Name
Dallas Holocaust Museum
Through March 18, 2012

A new emotionally stirring exhibit that focuses on child victims of the Holocaust has opened at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance. About 1.5 million children were murdered by the Nazi regime between 1933 and 1945.

Every Child Has a Name, which will be at the Museum through March 18, includes reproductions of children’s artwork created at a Nazi concentration camp, a traveling exhibit from the world’s preeminent Holocaust museum and an exhibit of a portion of 1.5 million pennies collected by Dallas school children as a memorial project.

Every Child Has a Name leaves visitors with a transformational and experiential understanding of how children in the midst of incomprehensible inhumanity hold onto the very essence of what others savagely wanted to take away—not just each Jewish child’s life, but also the sweetness of their childhoods.,” said Alice Murray, President and CEO of the Museum.

The special exhibition, free with regular admission to the Museum, is comprised of three major components.

Children’s Drawings and Poems from Terezín, 1942-1944

Between 1942 and 1944, 140,000 prisoners passed through the Terezín ghetto, which became a propaganda staging ground for representatives of organizations, such as the Red Cross, to observe how Jews were treated. Located approximately 38 miles from Prague, Czech Republic, Terezín became home to 15,000 children.

Also transported to Terezín were intellectuals, writers, artists, historians, teachers and professors, and composers and conductors known throughout the world. Thousands of those imprisoned worked in film and theater, along with scientists and religious leaders. To minimize the trauma of the Nazi’s treatment, the meager food, and the austere and crowded surroundings, the adults at Terezín created a school to educate and distract the children.

Children were forbidden to learn anything but crafts, drawing and singing, but gradually, even if illegally, languages, literature, history and the natural sciences were added to their studies. Drawing was taught by Friedl-Dicker Brandeis, a Viennese artist and art instructor, who was deported, along with her husband, to Terezín in 1942.

Terezín was also a temporary stop for Jews prior to being deported to the Auschwitz death camp in Poland.  Friedl-Dicker Brandeis and a majority of the children were deported to Auschwitz in October 1944.

Dicker-Brandeis left two well-hidden suitcases full of the children’s drawings at Terezín. When World War II ended in 1945, the suitcases were brought to the Jewish Museum of Prague where the paintings and drawings remained in their suitcases for 10 years.

After the artwork was rediscovered, reproductions were made and exhibited. The artwork has been viewed by millions throughout the world, but the Dallas Holocaust Museum exhibit is the first time the reproductions have been displayed in Dallas.

A book about the exhibit, I Never Saw Another Butterfly: Children’s Drawings and Poems from Terezín Concentration Camp, 1942-1944, is available in the Museum Store.

No Child’s Play, Children of the Holocaust: Creativity and Play

No Child’s Play is a selection from a traveling exhibit from Yad Vashem, Israel’s living memorial to the Holocaust located in Jerusalem. The exhibit looks at the world of Jewish children before and during the Holocaust.

Prior to the Holocaust, cultural environments for Jewish children were diverse socially and in religious outlook and belief. Their games, books, and toys often reflected popular culture, from hoola hoops to Mickey Mouse, and magnified the social diversity that existed in Europe prior to 1933.

Beginning in 1933, Jews were incarcerated in ghettos where survival was extremely difficult if not impossible; adults made every effort to provide children with schooling and organized activities for young people. Many children who were not imprisoned were concealed within Christian families.

No Child’s Play shares some of the realities of how Jewish children played during this time. The exhibition is curated by Yehudit Inbar of Yad Vashem.

One Penny for Every Murdered Child is 1.5 Million Pennies

 

A temporary sculpture incorporates 300,000 pennies that Dallas area school children collected as part of a six-year effort to collect 1.5 million pennies as a memorial to the 1.5 million children murdered during the Holocaust. The Penny Project involved efforts from several Dallas public and private schools. The exhibit of pennies provides a visual representation of the severity of the loss.

About the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance

Founded in 1984, the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance is dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust, and to teaching the moral and ethical response to prejudice, hatred and indifference, for the benefit of all humanity. The Museum, at 211 N. Record Street in downtown Dallas, has purchased land for a new facility adjacent to the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza in the Historic West End of downtown Dallas.

Exhibition Information

Every Child Has a Name

What: A new exhibition focused on child victims of the Holocaust. About 1.5 million children were murdered by the Nazi regime between 1933 and 1945. The exhibit includes emotion-stirring reproductions of children’s artwork created at a Nazi concentration camp, a travelling exhibit from the world’s pre-eminent Holocaust Museum and an exhibit of a portion of 1.5 million pennies collected by Dallas school children as a memorial project.

When: Through March 18, 2012
Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance
211 N. Record Street
Dallas, Texas 75202

Admission: Free with Museum admission
Adults – $8
Seniors – $6
Students (6 – 18) – $6
Groups of 15 or more – $2 off admission ticket prices ($4 for students, $6 for adults).

"Every Child Has a Name" at the Dallas Holocaust Museum / Center for Education and Tolerance

“Every Child Has a Name” at the Dallas Holocaust Museum / Center for Education and Tolerance

About Press Release

A press release on Dallas Art News is a post provided by a museum, gallery, venue, event or artist. The content of the press release does not usually change, but it is styled and formatted to fit our site.

Comments are closed.