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The Old Jail Art Center Announces New Exhibits

Vaqueros catching calf by Toni Frissell (photo courtesy King Ranch Archives)

Vaqueros catching calf by Toni Frissell (photo courtesy King Ranch Archives)

Two Women Look West: Photographs of King Ranch by Helen C. Kleberg and Toni Frissell
Justin Boyd: Time Has Slipped Rows
West Texas Triangle: Catherine Lee
The Old Jail Art Center
June 2 through September 9, 2012

The Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, has announced three new exhibits opening on June 2, 2012. The exhibits are Two Women Look West: Photographs of King Ranch by Helen C. Kleberg and Toni Frissell, Justin Boyd: Time Has Slipped Rows, and West Texas Triangle: Catherine Lee. All exhibits will run through September 9, 2012.

Two Women Look West: Photographs of King Ranch by Helen C. Kleberg and Toni Frissell

From the1930s to 50s Helen C. Kleberg, a self-taught photographer, and Toni Frissell, a well known New York fashion photographer and photojournalist, photographed similar subjects on the world-renowned King Ranch-one of the most prosperous and influential ranches in Texas. The 825,000-acre ranch, located in south Texas between Corpus Christi and Brownsville,became their open-air studio as both photographers captured similar subjects, from hunting scenes and vaqueros branding cattle to scientific experiments being conducted on the property. They also recorded family members and gatherings on the ranch, as well as the Kineños cowboys (Kings people or the people of King Ranch). The rich landscape and subjects represented something different to each photographer, and their photographs reflect their unique perspectives.

This exhibition offers the public an unprecedented view of King Ranch as observed by these two women. It is a rare opportunity to view Kleberg´s intimate photographs and Frissell´s iconic and dramatic photographs of King Ranch placed in the context of one another’s work. This exhibition is courtesy of the King Ranch Museum, Kingsville, Texas.

Justin Boyd: Time Has Slipped Rows

San Antonio-based artist Justin Boyd sets no limits for himself or his artwork when he creates projects that deal with the “American” sense of nostalgia, culture and subcultures, traditions, folklore, music and literature. Boyd utilizes a full range of media to engage our senses to convey his ideas and concepts including sound, video, drawing, sculpture, performance, and even smell. Whether an installation exploring the American highway Route 66, or singular works such as hissing and buzzing abstracted “sentinels” that confront pedestrians’ passage to a public entrance-Boyd’s creations challenge the viewer both intellectually and physically.

For his OJAC exhibition, Boyd continues his investigation of Americana and the American landscape with reflections on “…what we were, reconciling where we are with where we hope to be, and finally about pushing off bravely into what is still unknown.” A labyrinth of wire hums with the gusting sounds of West Texas winds as well as those of the solar winds of planet Jupiter as it guides the viewer/participant through the gallery space. The path leads to a Voyager-type craft, fully loaded with all the things one might need for a journey of unknown distance and destination.

West Texas Triangle: Catherine Lee

The West Texas Triangle (WTT), a consortium of five art museums, is pleased to announce a region-wide exhibition of sculpture, painting, prints, and ceramic works by international contemporary artist Catherine Lee.

Born and mostly raised in Pampa, Texas, Lee lived and worked in New York City for three decades before moving back to Texas in the 1990s. She first exhibited in New York at P.S.1 in 1980 and since then has participated in numerous exhibitions internationally. Lee has presented solo exhibitions at Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich; Irish Museum of Art, Dublin; Hôtel des Arts, Toulon; and Musée d’Art Moderne de Saint-Étienne Métropole. Her work is included in numerous public collections, including San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate Gallery, London; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and Blanton Museum of Art, Austin. Lee’s work is most often linked to the post-minimalist movement in both style and approach.

Versatile and prolific, Lee is as adept at firing raku ceramics as she is at welding metals. She is also an accomplished painter and printmaker, highly regarded for her large monotypes. In her paintings, she uses minimal, repetitive forms that elicit emotional responses, as seen in her early shaped paintings and her new grid-like Quanta paintings (2010-12). Lee’s interest in painting and sculpture merge in her series of free-standing bronze sculptures, which feature both monochromatic and richly hued patinas. Serialization is also an important theme in her work, as evidenced by her wall mounted bronze relief sculptures of the Alphabet series and monumental repeated ceramic wall installations. Each institution will present different selections by Lee, from large-scale sculpture and prints to mixed-media installation and paintings. An exhibition catalogue is being published by Charta in Milan, with the support of Galerie Lelong, and will feature essays by Hearne Pardee, Lilly Wei and Stephen Westfall. It will be available for sale during June 2012. Catherine Lee is represented by Galerie Lelong in New York and the dberman gallery in Texas.

The Old Jail Art Center

The Old Jail Art Center in Albany, Texas, has grown considerably since its humble beginnings in 1980. Starting with the donation of four private collections, the permanent collection has expanded to include over 2,100 works that span important periods in Asian, European, American, and pre-Columbian art. Successful capital campaigns in 1984, 1996 and 2009 have added an important education space, as well as additional exhibition and operation areas. The museum facilities now occupy approximately 15,000 square feet.

The collection is strong in a number of areas, with most works dating from the 20th Century. The collection includes pieces from well-known artists Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Henry Moore, John Marin, Charles Demuth, and Alexander Calder. In addition the museum has strong representation of the Fort Worth Circle (active 1945-55), the regional Taos Modernists (active 1948-1979), a small, impressive Asian Collection, and the W. O. Gross, Jr. Collection of pre-Columbian art. The outdoor sculpture collection is installed throughout the grounds, with key pieces placed inside the Marshall R. Young Courtyard, including Jesus Bautista Moroles’ granite Sun Symbol, Pericle Fazzini’s Conversation, and several other post-World War II Italian figurative bronze works.

The Old Jail Art Center is one of the few accredited fine art museums in Texas. Education, exhibitions and art programs are scheduled year-round to serve an audience of children, youth, adults, and visitors from around the globe. The Old Jail Art Center is located on Highway 6, two blocks east of Highway 180 in Albany, Texas. The museum is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. Please note: the museum is closed on Mondays and major holidays.

Vaqueros catching calf by Toni Frissell (photo courtesy King Ranch Archives)

Vaqueros catching calf by Toni Frissell (photo courtesy King Ranch Archives)

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